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    The Cleveland Browns’ $5 million, four-month renovation project vastly improves its Training and Administrative Complex in Berea, Ohio. The renovations are designed by the nationally recognized, integrated architecture, engineering, and technology design firm Westlake Reed Leskosky of Cleveland, Ohio, and recently recognized with an AIA Ohio 2014 Honor Award. The new workplace is a thoroughly modern space, respectful of the history and tradition of the Cleveland Browns yet forging a progressive identity for the team, via bold imagery, messaging, team branding and colors. Photography by Kevin G. Reeves.

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  • Healthcare

    Designed by HOK, the new Prebys Cardiovascular Institute in La Jolla, Calif., is conceived to be the region’s largest and most advanced center dedicated to cardiovascular care. Interior spaces support advanced medical treatment, patient care, research, clinical trials and graduate medical education. The seven-story, 167-bed hospital includes 59 intensive care beds, four operating rooms, two hybrid operating rooms, three cardiac catheterization labs and an electrophysiology lab connected to centralized research labs, and a center for graduate education. Stephen Whalen Photography

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  • Government

    The Wayne N. Aspinall Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Grand Junction, Colorado, received partial modernization and a high-performing green building renovation by the U. S. General Services Administration, Rocky Mountain Region. The Design-Build Partners were The Beck Group, as Design-Build Contractor and Architect-of-Record; and Westlake Reed Leskosky, was the Lead Design Architect, Integrated Engineer, Sustainable Design and Historic Preservation Consultant. Photography by Kevin G. Reeves.

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Corporate

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Healthcare

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Government

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Sustainable

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

At Duke University, a second life for trees

Andy O'Shea built a table from a campus tree. The table was placed in Duke's Smart Home. Photo by Sarah Burdick.

Andy O’Shea built a table from a campus tree. The table was placed in Duke’s Smart Home. Photo by Sarah Burdick.

In recent years, Duke University has needed to take down trees and limbs on East and West campuses for reasons such as age, construction or storm damage as part of Duke’s tree management program, which focuses on risk management, tree health and campus appearance. But after leaving Duke, trees are finding a second purpose – often back on campus.

Andy O’Shea, a carpenter at Duke for 21 years, made a 24-square-foot table with two 6-foot-long benches with wood harvested from an oak tree that once stood by the Allen Building on West Campus. That tree, which lived to be a century old, is now in the kitchen in Giles Residence Hall, offering a space where students study and share meals.

“It’s certainly not your run-of-the-mill, mass produced piece of material,” O’Shea said. “Each piece has character and requires more work that gives you a little artistic license to bring it to life.”

With each slab of wood, O’Shea likes to leave imperfections like saw marks, bumps and knots. A natural oil finish leaves his tables a dark brown. “It’s about showing off the rustic aesthetics,” he said. “I like to keep the wood’s character.”

Duke tries to repurpose fallen trees as part of Facilities Management’s wood policy, which provides guidelines for what happens to trees and brush that must be removed. From building furniture to mulching wood for aesthetics, the effort has helped Duke earn a Tree Campus USA designation from the Arbor Day Foundation for eight straight years.

When a new Student Health and Wellness Center opens in 2017 at the corner of Towerview and Union drives, oak paneling in the lobby, pharmacy and some desks will come from trees taken down at the center’s construction site. At the West Campus Reclamation Pond, removed trees were returned as lumber for the pond’s pavilion and decking, among other aspects. Additionally, when wood from Duke trees has been ground to pulp and sold, proceeds are donated to the Duke Forest.

“Our goal is to find a second use for all our wood,” said Steve Carrow, a project manager with Duke’s Facilities Management Department. “If we’re able to save it to be used on campus or elsewhere, we’re going to do it.”

Duke has spent the past decade replanting new trees across East and West campuses. Through 2018, Facilities expects to oversee the planting of about 1,000 additional trees. By that time, a campus inventory tracking the number of trees is expected to stand at about 15,200.