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AAMA releases updated document for Architectural Class windows and doors

 

Courtesy AAMA

Courtesy AAMA

The American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) released an updated document describing the test procedures and specifications Architectural Class windows and doors (AW). The AAMA 910-16, Voluntary “Life Cycle” Specifications and Test Methods for AW Class Architectural Windows and Doors, was last updated in 2010.

“AW windows and doors, covered in AAMA/WDMA/CSA 101/I.S.2/A440 (NAFS), are the only fenestration product types that go through accelerated life cycle testing including operating and thermal cycles followed by structural, air and water tests,” says Greg McKenna (Kawneer), chair of the AAMA 910 Lifecycle Testing Review Task Group. “AAMA 910 is an important document as it is referenced in NAFS and lists the sequence of tests to be conducted on these high performing products.”

Since its introduction more than 20 years ago, the AAMA 910 “Life Cycle” testing specification for AW products has been widely accepted by industry consultants and the specifying community. With the advance of technology, along with two decades of experience and test data from a variety of materials, this specification and test method has now been updated to reflect the changing needs of the marketplace, such as longer warranty periods, sustainable design, more durable finishes and increasingly more stringent code requirements. Enhancement of performance requirements, to include thermal cycling and increase the number of operating cycles, as well as increased misuse loads, helps to more clearly differentiate AW products from other Performance Classes. In addition, descriptive language has been clarified for ease of use.

This specification and test method is intended to model, through accelerated testing, the normal wear that can be expected during the life of a typical AW product.

“Reference standards were updated to their most current edition and other relevant test specifications were listed,” says Doug Holmberg (Apogee Enterprises, Inc./Wausau Window and Wall Systems), vice chair of the AAMA 910 Lifecycle Testing Review Task Group. “This specification and test method is intended to model, through accelerated testing, the life of a typical Architectural Class window or door with operating and locking hardware opening/closing cycles to simulate actual use, along with thermal cycling which is also an important durability attribute.”

AAMA 910-16, as well as other AAMA documents, may be purchased from AAMA’s online store.

More information about AAMA and its activities can be found via the AAMA Media Relations page or on the AAMA website.