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    The Golf Channel hit a hole in one with the revitalization of part of its Orlando campus. The channel turned to Walker Design LLC to create a high-functioning, multi-use space within a 1,200-square-foot area. The space holds conference and training areas plus a genius bar. It has fully integrated audio/visual technology, integrated writable surfaces for informal gatherings and multiple movable seating options that can house 150 occupants. The floor and ceiling patterns reflect lively, pixelated textures to contrast with and balance the static walls. Photography by Chad Baumer Photography.

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    UCHealth Longs Peak Hospital in Longmont, Colo., was designed by EYP Health to be an expandable, site-adaptable inpatient chassis that UCHealth could use at other locations. The new 210,000-square-foot hospital provides more than 50 inpatient beds and room to expand to more than 100. The hospital features an intensive care unit, operating rooms, a Level III trauma center and emergency department, advanced cardiac services, a birth center with a Level II special care nursery, a surgery center and 24-hour retail pharmacy, lab and imaging services. Photography by Jim Roof.

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    Do football facilities engender championships? Clemson University believes so. The 2016 National Champs invested $55 million in a new 142,500-square-foot facility designed by HOK. The Allen N. Reeves Football Complex further elevates Clemson’s program and promotes the recruitment, training and development of student-athletes. The facility is adjacent to Clemson’s Indoor Football Practice Facility and the existing outdoor practice fields, bringing all football activity into close proximity allowing for more efficient daily operations. Photos courtesy of HOK.

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Corporate

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Healthcare

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Government

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Sustainable

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

CBRE: Mexcio earthquake causes minor damage to commercial properties

CBRE

CBRE has released a report that outlines the impact of the recent 7.1 magnitude earthquake that stunned Mexico City (and surrounding states of Mexico, Morelos and Puebla) on the commercial real estate market. The areas of commentary include:

Overview:

  • The affected area is home to 33 million residents, 27% of Mexico’s population, and generates more than 30% of its national GDP.
  • At least 44 properties collapsed, with an additional 78 facing some damage or risk of collapsing. Thirty-five commercial properties are included in this total with Class B and C assets being the most affected.
  • As many as 1,800 properties, mostly residential, are believed to be damaged.

Office:

  • The majority of collapsed office buildings were in the Class B and C category.
  • Less than 10% of Mexico City’s Class B & C office stock, suffered significant damage.
  • Displaced tenants are looking for temporary, turnkey space, likely absorbing some of the 920,190 sq. m (9.8 million sq. ft.) of vacancy in the Class A leasing market.
  • Buildings with conditioned or furnished space are receiving increasing demand from displaced Class B & C building occupiers.

Industrial:

  • Significant industrial damage has not been widely reported. To date, CBRE has identified only a handful of industrial properties with substantial damage.
  • As part of the recovery, a spike in demand for warehouse space is expected from building supply companies, disaster relief providers and consumer-goods distributors, which will further compress vacancy in the Mexico City metropolitan area.

Retail:

  • Neighborhood and community shopping centers in Taxqueña and Coapa, located in the southern section of Mexico City, reported the most impact.
  • Street-level retail space in mixed-use buildings and residential buildings were also affected, especially in the Roma-Condesa submarket where as many as five buildings collapsed.
  • Consumer goods and building supply retailers will see increased sales volume, which will supplement current growth in Mexico City retail activity, especially for home-improvement goods and grocery centers.

Hotel:

  • Approximately 5% of the 52,000 hotel rooms in Mexico City reported some degree of damage and occupancy dropped significantly the week following the earthquake.
  • Long-term, there will likely be no adverse impact to Mexico’s largest hotel base, which is primarily driven by business travelers.

CBRE EXPERT: Spencer Levy, Head of Research, Americas | Senior Economic Advisor:

“While Mexico continues improving construction standards and codes, there are numerous properties that because of age, sediment, location or other challenges are structurally vulnerable to earthquakes. As many as 1,800 properties, mostly residential, are believed to be damaged.

“Despite the devastating power of the earthquake, which displaced businesses and thousands of residents in one of the world’s most densely populated regions, damage to commercial real estate was relatively minor. Only a small amount of the overall stock of office space was impacted, with most of this damage limited to Class B and C properties. As a result, we expect to see a ‘flight to quality’ as demand increases for modern buildings that are considered structurally sound.

“Mexico City is also the main logistics hub for the rest of the country, so infrastructure upgrades will be made to get supply chains quickly rebooted.”

To read the full report, click here.