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    The Golf Channel hit a hole in one with the revitalization of part of its Orlando campus. The channel turned to Walker Design LLC to create a high-functioning, multi-use space within a 1,200-square-foot area. The space holds conference and training areas plus a genius bar. It has fully integrated audio/visual technology, integrated writable surfaces for informal gatherings and multiple movable seating options that can house 150 occupants. The floor and ceiling patterns reflect lively, pixelated textures to contrast with and balance the static walls. Photography by Chad Baumer Photography.

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    UCHealth Longs Peak Hospital in Longmont, Colo., was designed by EYP Health to be an expandable, site-adaptable inpatient chassis that UCHealth could use at other locations. The new 210,000-square-foot hospital provides more than 50 inpatient beds and room to expand to more than 100. The hospital features an intensive care unit, operating rooms, a Level III trauma center and emergency department, advanced cardiac services, a birth center with a Level II special care nursery, a surgery center and 24-hour retail pharmacy, lab and imaging services. Photography by Jim Roof.

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    Do football facilities engender championships? Clemson University believes so. The 2016 National Champs invested $55 million in a new 142,500-square-foot facility designed by HOK. The Allen N. Reeves Football Complex further elevates Clemson’s program and promotes the recruitment, training and development of student-athletes. The facility is adjacent to Clemson’s Indoor Football Practice Facility and the existing outdoor practice fields, bringing all football activity into close proximity allowing for more efficient daily operations. Photos courtesy of HOK.

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The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

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The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

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The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

CDC map tracks investment to combat antibiotic resistance

Click for interactive features of the CDC's AR map.

Click image for interactive features of the CDC’s AR map.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released in January new data in its Antibiotic Resistance (AR) Investment Map, which shows early progress by states to combat AR. This year’s AR Investment Map features more than 170 state-reported successes—like rapidly identifying and containing rare and concerning resistant germs to protect communities. Each state reported multiple successes. These are the first comprehensive reports on state progress made following the first year of Congress’ unprecedented investment in CDC’s Antibiotic Resistance Solutions Initiative.

The AR Investment Map displays CDC’s AR activities in printable state- and city-specific fact sheets, providing a comprehensive view of CDC’s resources to protect Americans from antibiotic-resistant infections. Antibiotic resistance occurs when germs no longer respond to the drugs designed to kill them. Some germs already have become resistant to all available antibiotics, making some completely untreatable.

“Antibiotic resistance has the potential to impact all Americans at every stage of life,” said CDC Director Brenda Fitzgerald, M.D. “This interactive map showcases the work happening on the frontlines of every state and CDC’s commitment to keep people safe from drug-resistant infections.”

In fiscal year 2016, CDC made investments in all 50 states, six large cities, and Puerto Rico to enhance laboratory and epidemiology expertise and grow public health innovations to fight antibiotic resistance across healthcare settings, food, and communities.

These investments helped states like Oklahoma and Connecticut each successfully identify and contain a single case of Candida auris, a multidrug-resistant fungus that can cause deadly infections.

Early progress shows antibiotic resistance investments are working

Also displayed in the new AR Investment Map are successes states reported for fiscal year 2017:

  • In Tennessee, when a person got a rare and concerning infection, the state health department and facility immediately began CDC’s containment protocol and isolated the patient. Within 48 hours, the teams fully executed the containment protocol (AR Lab Network testing, infection control assessments, colonization screening). Since then, the facility has not identified additional cases.
  • Michigan reduced “nightmare bacteria” CRE by 30 percent in 40 facilities and prevented more than 300 infections through its surveillance and prevention initiative.
  • Thirty-eight states and two cities now use whole genome sequencing to monitor for outbreaks and identify antibiotic resistance for Listeria, Salmonella, Campylobacter, and E. coli that are commonly transmitted through food and animal contact. When these outbreaks are detected, local CDC-supported epidemiologists investigate the cases to stop the outbreaks and spread of resistance. Since the end of fiscal year 2017, six more health departments successfully implemented whole genome sequencing.
  • In Kentucky, an aggressive and coordinated response to a rare and concerning resistance gene successfully contained the outbreak and stopped its spread.
  • California increased its local response capacity to combat resistant gonorrhea and increased its rapid susceptibility testing by eight-fold. Susceptibility testing shows how well a gonorrhea strain will respond to specific antibiotics. These results are used to inform local outbreak response action, national treatment guidelines, and antibiotic resistance trends.

In its mission to protect people, a significant portion of CDC’s AR investments goes to enhancing infrastructure in health departments nationwide. Since 2016, CDC has provided $144 million to 56 state and local health departments and Puerto Rico to address this threat. CDC has also invested more than $76 million in more than 60 universities and healthcare partners to find and implement innovative ways to prevent resistant infections and contain their spread.

The updated AR Investment Map reflects fiscal year 2017 extramural funding and highlights CDC’s collaborations that protect people worldwide. CDC continues to partner with health departments; academia; and the healthcare, veterinary, and agriculture industries to advance the science and implement strategies that protect Americans from antibiotic resistance.

Learn more about CDC’s AR Solutions Initiative and ongoing work to combat AR at www.cdc.gov/DrugResistance.