973.509.7277
  • Corporate

    The Golf Channel hit a hole in one with the revitalization of part of its Orlando campus. The channel turned to Walker Design LLC to create a high-functioning, multi-use space within a 1,200-square-foot area. The space holds conference and training areas plus a genius bar. It has fully integrated audio/visual technology, integrated writable surfaces for informal gatherings and multiple movable seating options that can house 150 occupants. The floor and ceiling patterns reflect lively, pixelated textures to contrast with and balance the static walls. Photography by Chad Baumer Photography.

    Related ArticleMore
  • Healthcare

    UCHealth Longs Peak Hospital in Longmont, Colo., was designed by EYP Health to be an expandable, site-adaptable inpatient chassis that UCHealth could use at other locations. The new 210,000-square-foot hospital provides more than 50 inpatient beds and room to expand to more than 100. The hospital features an intensive care unit, operating rooms, a Level III trauma center and emergency department, advanced cardiac services, a birth center with a Level II special care nursery, a surgery center and 24-hour retail pharmacy, lab and imaging services. Photography by Jim Roof.

    Related ArticleMore
  • Education

    Do football facilities engender championships? Clemson University believes so. The 2016 National Champs invested $55 million in a new 142,500-square-foot facility designed by HOK. The Allen N. Reeves Football Complex further elevates Clemson’s program and promotes the recruitment, training and development of student-athletes. The facility is adjacent to Clemson’s Indoor Football Practice Facility and the existing outdoor practice fields, bringing all football activity into close proximity allowing for more efficient daily operations. Photos courtesy of HOK.

    Related ArticleMore

Corporate

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Healthcare

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Government

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Sustainable

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

CDC: Nearly half of world’s busiest airports have smoke-free policies

1280px-US_CDC_logo.svgAmong the 50 busiest airports in the world, 23 have smoke-free indoor policies. This means air travelers and employees at 46 percent of the world’s busiest airports are protected from exposure to secondhand smoke. The other 27 busiest airports allow smoking in designated or ventilated indoor areas.

The report published November 22, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), is the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s first assessment of smoke-free policies in the world’s airports. More than 2.7 billion passengers annually pass through the airports included in the study.

Airports were defined as having a smoke-free policy if they completely prohibited smoking in all indoor areas. The 27 airports defined as having no smoke-free policy allowed smoking in designated smoking rooms, restaurants, bars, or airline clubs.

Smoke-free policies protect travelers, workers from secondhand smoke

“The Surgeon General has concluded there is no risk-free level of secondhand smoke exposure‎,” said Corinne Graffunder, D.Ph., M.P.H., director of CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health. “Even brief exposure can have health consequences.”

The study, which assessed policies in 2017, found significant variations in smoke-free policy status by region. In North America, 78 percent (14 of 18) of the busiest airports have a smoke-free policy; in Europe, 44 percent (4 of 9); in Asia, 18 percent (4 of 22). All four of the Asian airports with a smoke-free policy are in China.

A previous CDC study documented that secondhand smoke can transfer from designated smoking areas into nonsmoking areas in airports, where nonsmoking travelers and employees can be exposed. As a result, travelers and workers are at risk of secondhand smoke exposure in these airports.

“Separating smokers from nonsmokers, cleaning the air, and ventilating buildings cannot eliminate exposure of nonsmokers to secondhand smoke,” said Brian King, Ph.D., Deputy Director for Research Translation in the Office on Smoking and Health. “People who spend time in, pass by, clean, or work near these rooms are at risk of exposure to secondhand smoke.”

Secondhand smoke causes an estimated 34,000 heart disease deaths and 7,300 lung cancer deaths each year in the United States. Exposure to secondhand smoke from burning tobacco products causes premature death and disease including coronary heart disease, stroke, and lung cancer among nonsmoking adults. In children, it can cause sudden infant death syndrome, acute respiratory infections, middle ear disease, exacerbated asthma, respiratory symptoms, and decreased lung function.