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    The Golf Channel hit a hole in one with the revitalization of part of its Orlando campus. The channel turned to Walker Design LLC to create a high-functioning, multi-use space within a 1,200-square-foot area. The space holds conference and training areas plus a genius bar. It has fully integrated audio/visual technology, integrated writable surfaces for informal gatherings and multiple movable seating options that can house 150 occupants. The floor and ceiling patterns reflect lively, pixelated textures to contrast with and balance the static walls. Photography by Chad Baumer Photography.

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  • Healthcare

    UCHealth Longs Peak Hospital in Longmont, Colo., was designed by EYP Health to be an expandable, site-adaptable inpatient chassis that UCHealth could use at other locations. The new 210,000-square-foot hospital provides more than 50 inpatient beds and room to expand to more than 100. The hospital features an intensive care unit, operating rooms, a Level III trauma center and emergency department, advanced cardiac services, a birth center with a Level II special care nursery, a surgery center and 24-hour retail pharmacy, lab and imaging services. Photography by Jim Roof.

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    Do football facilities engender championships? Clemson University believes so. The 2016 National Champs invested $55 million in a new 142,500-square-foot facility designed by HOK. The Allen N. Reeves Football Complex further elevates Clemson’s program and promotes the recruitment, training and development of student-athletes. The facility is adjacent to Clemson’s Indoor Football Practice Facility and the existing outdoor practice fields, bringing all football activity into close proximity allowing for more efficient daily operations. Photos courtesy of HOK.

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Corporate

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Healthcare

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Government

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Sustainable

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Greywater do’s and don’ts for FMs

One of the many ways commercial facilities are reducing water consumption is to use greywater. Greywater is referred to as “gently used” water coming from restroom sinks, kitchen sinks, showers, etc.

These facilities are often “doubled plumbed,” with greywater going into storage tanks and water from toilets and urinals discharged into sewer systems.

While some greywater may look discolored, even “dirty,” it is usually safe, even beneficial to use to irrigate vegetation, even though it should not be used for human consumption.

Because facilities that are landscaped often use more water for vegetation than anywhere else, if water can be re-used here, it can prove to be a significant water and cost savings.

However, according to Klaus Reichardt, CEO, and founder of Waterless Co. Inc., manufacturers of no-water urinals, there are some rules and guidelines we must follow to use greywater properly. Among these are the following:

  • Greywater should not be stored for more than 24 hours. After that, it will start to breakdown and odors may develop
  • Avoid touching greywater. While we said it is “gently used” water, it can contain pathogens that are harmful if consumed by people
  • Don’t let greywater “pool” on the surface. This can result in mosquito breeding grounds
  • While some plumbing will be required, as mentioned earlier, elaborate pumps and filters are usually not necessary. These extra systems require maintenance, can be costly, and need energy to operate.
  • Don’t over water vegetation with greywater. Irrigate vegetation with the same amount of water as you would with freshwater.
  • Install a valve system that makes it easy to switch from a greywater source to a freshwater source, just in case the greywater tank is dry.

“Building owners and managers should also switch to greywater friendly products,” says Reichardt. “For instance, many environmentally preferable cleaning solutions, laundry detergents, even dishwashing detergents will not affect the pH of water so they can be perfect for greywater.”