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    The Golf Channel hit a hole in one with the revitalization of part of its Orlando campus. The channel turned to Walker Design LLC to create a high-functioning, multi-use space within a 1,200-square-foot area. The space holds conference and training areas plus a genius bar. It has fully integrated audio/visual technology, integrated writable surfaces for informal gatherings and multiple movable seating options that can house 150 occupants. The floor and ceiling patterns reflect lively, pixelated textures to contrast with and balance the static walls. Photography by Chad Baumer Photography.

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  • Healthcare

    UCHealth Longs Peak Hospital in Longmont, Colo., was designed by EYP Health to be an expandable, site-adaptable inpatient chassis that UCHealth could use at other locations. The new 210,000-square-foot hospital provides more than 50 inpatient beds and room to expand to more than 100. The hospital features an intensive care unit, operating rooms, a Level III trauma center and emergency department, advanced cardiac services, a birth center with a Level II special care nursery, a surgery center and 24-hour retail pharmacy, lab and imaging services. Photography by Jim Roof.

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    Do football facilities engender championships? Clemson University believes so. The 2016 National Champs invested $55 million in a new 142,500-square-foot facility designed by HOK. The Allen N. Reeves Football Complex further elevates Clemson’s program and promotes the recruitment, training and development of student-athletes. The facility is adjacent to Clemson’s Indoor Football Practice Facility and the existing outdoor practice fields, bringing all football activity into close proximity allowing for more efficient daily operations. Photos courtesy of HOK.

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Corporate

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Healthcare

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Government

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Sustainable

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Inaugural ‘Commercial Construction Index’ indicates high revenue and employment expectations for 2017

Commercial construction is in high demand across the country and contractors are confident in the trajectory of the industry, according to the USG + U.S. Chamber of Commerce Commercial Construction Index (‘Index’). Nearly all contractors surveyed – 96 percent – expect revenues to grow or remain stable this year compared to 2016, with 40 percent expecting an increase and only 3 percent expecting a decrease in revenue.

The Index is a new quarterly economic indicator designed to gauge what drives the commercial construction industry and its leaders, including specific issues like backlog of work, new business pipeline, revenue projections, workforce issues, and access to financing. Given the sector’s importance to the U.S. economy and the outsized role it could play in years to come, the data contained in the Index will be vital to better understanding trends, challenges and opportunities. The research was developed with Dodge Data & Analytics (DD&A), the leading provider of insights and data for the construction industry, by surveying commercial and institutional contractors.

“This first-of-its-kind Index was born out of a need to understand the issues that affect commercial construction. The Index will deliver critical insights into the future health of the industry,” said Jennifer Scanlon, president and chief executive officer of USG Corporation. “USG is committed to providing solutions for our customers in order to help the entire industry make strong contributions to the U.S. economy. Through the Index we are able to identify areas of strength and pinpoint areas of improvement where industry leaders must focus.”

Two-thirds (66 percent) of contractors said they expect to employ more workers in the next six months, indicating growth in a sector that employs approximately 3 million Americans. But 61 percent of Index respondents reported difficultly finding skilled workers. The contractors reported the biggest shortages in the concrete, interior finishes/millwork, masonry, electrical and plumbing trades.

“The commercial construction industry is a vital engine for the American economy,” said Tom Donohue, president and CEO of the U.S. Chamber. “The projected growth uncovered in this research is good news for employers and workers, but there is reason for concern in the lack of qualified talent available in vital specialties. To get our economy growing to its full potential, we must ensure that we have a workforce that is ready to fill the available jobs. Each quarter, this first-of-its-kind research will make us smarter about future challenges and inform solutions for our country’s leaders.”

The report looks at the results of three leading indicators – backlog levels, new business opportunities and revenue forecasts – to generate a composite index on a scale of 0-100 that serves as an indicator of health for the contractor segment on a quarterly basis. The Q2 2017 composite index score was 76, representing continued health in the sector. This composite score is up two points from a 74 in the Q1 survey, driven primarily by a bump in the ratio between actual and ideal backlog. New business and revenue results also saw slight increases quarter-over-quarter.

The composite scores from the three drivers of confidence were:

  • Backlog: 81, up four points in Q2 over Q1.
    Contractors’ current average backlog levels represent 81 percent of their ideal backlog levels, up from 77 percent in Q1. On average, contractors currently hold 9.9 months of backlog, while the ideal amount is 12 months.
  • New Business: 77, up two points in Q2.
    Nearly all contractors continue to report high or moderate confidence in the market. Well over half of contractors (59 percent) reported high confidence in new business over the next 12 months (up from 51 percent in Q1), indicating a shift to higher levels of confidence among some respondents.
  • Revenues: 71, up two points in Q2.
    An overwhelming 96 percent of contractors expect revenues to grow or remain stable in 2017 over 2016. Of those expecting revenue increases, the actual percentage of expected increases varies widely. Forty percent expect revenue increases of 7 percent or more in the next 12 months.

The Index findings are compiled using survey results from contractors within a DD&A panel of more than 2,700 decision makers from across key facets of the commercial construction industry. This first public report was developed using research from previous quarters, which puts into context the state of contractor sentiment in the U.S. building industry.