973.509.7277
  • Corporate

    The Cleveland Browns’ $5 million, four-month renovation project vastly improves its Training and Administrative Complex in Berea, Ohio. The renovations are designed by the nationally recognized, integrated architecture, engineering, and technology design firm Westlake Reed Leskosky of Cleveland, Ohio, and recently recognized with an AIA Ohio 2014 Honor Award. The new workplace is a thoroughly modern space, respectful of the history and tradition of the Cleveland Browns yet forging a progressive identity for the team, via bold imagery, messaging, team branding and colors. Photography by Kevin G. Reeves.

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  • Healthcare

    Designed by HOK, the new Prebys Cardiovascular Institute in La Jolla, Calif., is conceived to be the region’s largest and most advanced center dedicated to cardiovascular care. Interior spaces support advanced medical treatment, patient care, research, clinical trials and graduate medical education. The seven-story, 167-bed hospital includes 59 intensive care beds, four operating rooms, two hybrid operating rooms, three cardiac catheterization labs and an electrophysiology lab connected to centralized research labs, and a center for graduate education. Stephen Whalen Photography

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  • Government

    The Wayne N. Aspinall Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Grand Junction, Colorado, received partial modernization and a high-performing green building renovation by the U. S. General Services Administration, Rocky Mountain Region. The Design-Build Partners were The Beck Group, as Design-Build Contractor and Architect-of-Record; and Westlake Reed Leskosky, was the Lead Design Architect, Integrated Engineer, Sustainable Design and Historic Preservation Consultant. Photography by Kevin G. Reeves.

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Corporate

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Healthcare

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Government

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Sustainable

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

June 12-14: Top picks for NeoCon education seminars

NeoCon2017-SocialMedia-400x400NeoCon will be held June 12 to 14 at The Mart in Chicago. NeoCon  has evolved into one of the most recognized and attended trade shows in the industry and this year will be no exception. With the help of our Advisory Council, the show has remained focused on being at the forefront of changing commercial design and business trends.

The three-day event attracts nearly 50,000 design professionals and will offer more than 100 education seminars with CEU credits.

Here are our picks for some of the most compelling and unique seminars to catch during NeoCon:

Monday

[M100] DESIGNING FOR FOCUS WORK
Monday, June 12 • 9:30 AM – 10:30 AM
A poorly designed and distracting workplace, and one in which collaboration is favored over focus work, often leads to a poor staff performance. To overcome these three obstacles, in this seminar you’ll uncover the myth of multitasking to learn how focus work is crucial even in collaboration, as well as how your firm should design for both. You’ll assess how attention, distraction, flow and situational awareness play vital roles in focus work, learning the telling facts about human cognition in the process. You’ll also examine how the physical workplace helps determine not only performance, but also your firm’s bottom line. To fully encapsulate your newfound knowledge and create a high-performing firm, you’ll apply the five key design elements. [INTERMEDIATE][OF] Dr. Gabor Nagy, research program manager, Haworth, Inc., San Francisco, CA

 

[M101] A MATERIAL WORLD: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF FLOORING MATERIAL INFLUENCE ON PATIENT, STAFF AND VISITOR SAFETY, SATISFACTION AND QUALITY OF CARE
Monday, June 12 • 9:30 AM – 10:30 AM
Those who use patient rooms the most (patients, staff and visitors) are the ones most affected by the indoor environmental quality (IEQ), especially the flooring materials. To best understand how flooring materials influence safety, satisfaction and quality of care, we’ll examine the IEQ by focusing on lighting, acoustics, thermal comfort and air contaminants. We’ll determine priorities for flooring selection such as cost, cleaning, safety, patients’ comfort and quality of care. Training an eye on staff and patient preferences for flooring and preventing accidents, we’ll review the design implications for everyone’s experience and safety. [BASIC][FC/R][HC][HSW] Dr. Debra Harris, AAHID, CEO, RAD Consultants, Austin, TX

 

[M103] SUSTAINABILITY FOR BIM PROJECTS — MAKING SMART CHOICES
Monday, June 12 • 9:30 AM – 10:30 AM
One huge challenge of BIM projects is that 90% have no sustainability information about the featured project, leading to difficulties in assessing projects for LEED and WELL systems. The challenge arose from inaccurate and outdated manual inputting. We propose a solution: to use new BIM tools to more effectively search, discover, update sustainable products and access supporting documentation. We’ll hone in on best practices for evaluating these new BIM tools, as well as learning how design teams have used the tools in actual projects. We’ll also give out information available in BIM tools and their use in both LEED and WELL projects. [GR][FC/R][HSW] Mark Rossolo, public affairs director, UL Environment, Marietta, GA
Mike Collins, CEO, Global Product Data, Rosewell, GA

 

[M105] FRACTAL ARCHITECTURE — BRINGING THE OUTSIDE IN
Monday, June 12 • 9:30 AM – 10:30 AM
Your father’s geometry is not yours. Now, architects are embracing fractal geometry—the geometry of nature—to create both interior and exterior designs. Lighting doesn’t travel in a straight line, fractal geometry teaches us, and we’ll investigate the many ways fractal geometry defines our world and universe. Based on our investigation, we will show how to make a building fractal, since the shape of sustainability and biophilic design can tie them closely to nature. Finally, although the fractal concept is new, it has actually reverberated through the history of architecture, and we’ll look at some of the finest examples. [INTERMEDIATE][GR][FC/R] Douglas Boldt, AIA, Green Assoc., senior project architect, Moody Nolan, Chicago, IL

 

[M106] HOSPITALITY COMES TO THE OFFICE
Monday, June 12 • 9:30 AM – 10:30 AM
Lauren Rottet will discuss how office design is taking cues from the great hoteliers in designing comfortable, service-oriented workspaces for today’s office worker, client, and guest. In this special presentation, attendees will discover how the best hoteliers and hotel designers fine-tune every aspect of the design–from the overall plan to the private space and social shared space–to suit the needs of the customer while simultaneously creating a fun, relaxed environment. Rottet will reveal the design process, which involves conceptualizing and storytelling to set the right tone and paying attention to the minute details of design down to the uniforms, music, and scents—all in order to create guest comfort and satisfaction. She will also share examples of a number of hotels she has designed such as The Surrey on NYC’s Upper East Side (which has remained the No. 1 Hotel in New York City since she designed it 9 years ago), the St. Regis in Aspen, new properties recently completed for Four Seasons and underway with Conrad Hilton, and her work with award-winning Viking Cruises. Attendees will walk away knowing how to captivate the employee and client from the moment they walk in the door–providing all their functional needs whilst making them feel welcome, comfortable, and special, and servicing them beyond what they have experienced in the corporate environment. [INTERMEDIATE][HOSP][OF] Lauren Rottet, FAIA, FIIDA, NCARB, founding principal and president, Rottet Studio, New York, NY

 

[M116] HANDS OFF MY PLAY – DOH! THE IMPORTANCE OF SPACE AND FURNITURE IN EARLY EDUCATION
Monday, June 12 • 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
During the crucial K-5 years, children develop their learning styles, encounter possible learning impairments and learn to work with others, all during the time in their learning lives when they’re most sensitive to their environment. Because we want all students to receive the best education possible, we’ll hone in on their environments and their effects, especially how dynamic design can influence the way young children learn and grow. We’ll examine how to design environments that speaks to the children’s needs, as well as focusing on how to help teachers best engage high-touch, dynamic and innovative spaces. We’ll gain insights into how future classrooms can be forged to attain maximum flexibility, including the spatial and furniture requirements specific to early childhood education. To conclude, we’ll look to important design changes that improve the early childhood classroom. [BASIC][HSW][INST] Brandea Morton, NCIDQ, IIDA, interior designer, DLR Group, Omaha, NE
Vanessa Schutte, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, principal/k-12 education leader, DLR Group, Omaha, NE

 

[M117] THE FUTURE OF ARCHITECTURAL VISUALIZATION: EXPLORING NEW DEVELOPMENTS IN VIRTUAL REALITY
Monday, June 12 • 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
We are experiencing the dawn of the application of Virtual Reality in our industry. Will your firm learn how and when to use this game-changing but expensive technology – or be left behind? This session includes a brief history of the development of VR to help you understand where we are today and what to expect in the coming years. We’ll examine case studies to understand applications and lessons learned. We’ll also discuss how best to weigh the costs and benefits to determine which projects are the best candidates for VR. You’ll also come away with a practical sense of what you need to start a VR project, including considerations for customizing software to create the optimal experience. [INTERMEDIATE][PD] Daniel Zeballos, ASAI, principal/production manager, Illustrate My Design, Alexandria, VA
Florencia Bialet, principal, Illustrate My Design, Alexandria, VA

 

[M119] COMPETITIVE INTELLIGENCE: TECHNOLOGY AS BOTH DISRUPTOR AND ENABLER
Monday, June 12 • 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Disruption caused by technological breakthroughs is accelerating exponentially, changing the landscape of the modern workplace – and creating new opportunities for employees. At the same time, knowledge work in the age of smart machines is increasingly dependent on human-machine partnerships, creating a blended reality where the physical and the digital have a symbiotic relationship. In this session, we will explore the yet-to-be-defined workspace that lies between personal devices and the cloud. We will review the current state of technology and tools in the workplace as well as breakthroughs on the horizon and their impact on knowledge workers and the environments in which they work. Looking to the future, the speakers will outline the ways in which competitive intelligence might be human-machine centric and the user experience forever amplified. [ADVANCED][FM][FT][OF] Jim Thompson, AIA, director of design, Little, Charlotte, NC
Jeff Gunther, founder, Metaform, Charlotte, NC

 

[M122] HUMANIZING DIAGNOSTIC & PROCEDURE SPACES IN HOSPITALS
Monday, June 12 • 2:30 PM – 3:30 PM
Advances in medicine have led to an increasing demand in hospitals for fully integrated labs that provide a complete array of diagnostic platforms within a single operating suite. In these sterile, potentially intimidating spaces, often bristling with ominous technology, it is vital to create a calming environment for patients, many of whom are under only local or twilight sedation. Learn how architects and designers, in collaboration with medical personnel, can use planning, finishes, color and glazing to create “patient well-being zones.” We’ll detail the ways in which multi-zoned, dimmable and color-changing lighting effects that simulate daylight can reduce stress and set a serene mood. We’ll also review strategies for hiding masses of cabling, which can tangle a medical suite in a spider web of cords and cables. This session will employ interactive learning through polling software, adding an element of audience participation that was used at Neocon 2016. [INTERMEDIATE][HC][HSW] Dr. Rada Doytcheva, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, principal /head of design, RADA Architects Ltd, Chicago, IL
Marsha Spencer, AIA, LEED AP, NCARB, project manager, Stantec Architecture, Chicago, IL

 

[M126] RISE OF HUMAN FACTOR
Monday, June 12 • 2:30 PM – 3:30 PM
In the new work place, responding to the ping factor only seems crucial. In fact, the incessant beckoning of technology leads us away from efficiency, proficiency and the human factor—each other. To reverse this trend, in our seminar we’ll discover how to design a workplace based on humans, not technology; on movement, not sitting and waiting for the next ping; as well as on space and time devoted to building bonds with each other. Healthy, happy workers are the result, which in turn, boosts productivity. We’ll tailor our approach to best accommodate a variety of work styles, diverse demographics and your firm’s unique culture. We’ll also identify and enlist key design elements and strategies that help employee engage with other, not just with their devices. [INTERMEDIATE][FM][OF] Pam Light, FIIDA, NCIDQ, LEED AP, regional leader, workplace, HOK, Culver City, CA
Brad Liebman, LEED GA, regional leader, workplace, HOK, St. Louis, MO

 

[M128] UNOFFICE THE OFFICE: CREATING A NEW TYPOLOGY BASED ON EMOTIONAL, INTELLECTUAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSE TO PLACE
Monday, June 12 • 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM
The importance of physiological and emotional response to place is often underrated in evidence-based workplace design. While great emphasis is placed on reduced sick days and low turnover, the seldom-measured factors relating to tactility and the human touch should be given their due. This presentation will explore the bias surrounding workplace and office building typologies that prevent us from exploring completely new ideas, and recognizing that in fact, the soft aspects of successful design can and should be the hard drivers. Attendees will learn to identify and question this bias, opening up the interpretation of the office. The seminar will help participants discover how to achieve the appearance of a hand-crafted aesthetic; create variety and avoid repetition without sacrificing ease of reconfiguration or cost; and to elevate the ordinary in the work environment. [INTERMEDIATE][HSW][OF][PD] Shannon Gaffney, AIA, IIDA, founder/co-managing partner, SkB Architects, Seattle, WA
Jim Brett, president, West Elm at Williams-Sonoma, Inc., San Francisco, CA
Jim Stelter, CEO, Inscape, Falconer, NY

 

[M132] LED’S HAVE TAKEN OVER! — NOW LET’S MAKE SURE WE USE THEM PROPERLY
Monday, June 12 • 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM
The transition from vacuum tube to solid state (aka LED) lighting has transformed most market segments, but in some cases, a “race to the bottom” has left quality and aesthetics sadly lacking. With an overview of how LED luminaires work as our basis, we will investigate how the design/specification community can encourage the proper use and adaptation of this amazing new technology for today’s requirements. Attendees will learn the mechanical structure of an LED luminaire; recognize positive and negative aesthetic features of LEDs; understand appropriate measures of performance as applied to LED lighting; and know how to write a performance specification for luminaires that includes aesthetics. [INTERMEDIATE][FT][LT] Wilson Dau, LC, LEED AP, MIES, principal, Dau Design and Consulting Inc., Victoria, BC

Tuesday

[T201] QUANTIFYING THE IMPACT OF WORKPLACE CHANGE – YES, IT CAN (AND SHOULD) BE DONE
Tuesday, June 13 • 9:30 AM – 10:30 AM
Would you be surprised to learn that a ten-minute-a-day increase in employee productivity could easily offset the entire cost of a workplace change initiative? This session will explain the math behind this concept. In doing so, the session will teach you how to use the metrics to estimate and/or measure the ROI of workplace change; help you apply it to make a business case for projects large and small; and show you how to invest your project dollars for maximum impact. Speakers will share a free and easy-too-use tool that makes it simple to quantify the impact of workplace change on productivity, efficiency, turnover, absenteeism, and employee health. [ADVANCED][DS][FM][OF] Kate Lister, IFMA, CoreNet, SHRM, president, Global Workplace Analytics, Carlsbad, CA
Kate North, IFMA, CoreNet, president, Workplace Evolutionaries, Chicago, IL

 

[T202] THE POWER OF EXPONENTIAL THINKING: CREATING THE XPRIZE FOR HEALTHY BUILDINGS
Tuesday, June 13 • 9:30 AM – 10:30 AM
The $9 trillion global construction industry is responsible for nearly 60 percent of climate change emissions, a third of landfill waste, and a shocking array of negative health effects. Yet the way buildings are built has remained relatively unchanged for nearly 200 years. Even the most advanced construction projects continue to use ancient techniques of modular assembly. In 2016, the XPRIZE Foundation established a “moonshot” for construction by creating the XPRIZE for Healthy Buildings. The team approached this unique opportunity to develop a way to literally grow buildings by fusing synthetic biology, genomics, parametric modeling and 3D printing to shift from a petrochemical world to a biochemical one. This session will teach you the value of exponential thinking in approaching your design problems; demonstrate the methodology of the XPRIZE for Healthy Buildings; uncover new ways to approach healthy materials; and help you develop a roadmap for your own projects and the future of Living Buildings. [INTERMEDIATE][GR][FC/R][HSW] Eric Corey Freed, RA, LEED Fellow, Hon FIGP, founding principal, organicARCHITECT, Portland, OR

 

[T205] ARE HEADPHONES REALLY THE ANSWER?
Tuesday, June 13 • 9:30 AM – 10:30 AM
As dynamic, open-plan office environments have become the norm, their one drawback has become clear – acoustic distraction and lack of acoustic privacy. Our zeal for creating collaborative and innovation-driving workplaces has made it increasingly difficult for workers to focus and actually get work done! This seminar provides an overview of today’s workplace trends, together with space-planning and acoustic solutions that can mitigate distraction and increase both employee satisfaction and productivity. Attendees will discover how to design a “soundscape” appropriate for a space; understand the science behind distraction, as well as how different generations and personality types respond and react; and leave with a variety of specific design solutions to address or avoid distraction in the workplace. [INTERMEDIATE][FT][HSW][OF] Sarah Springer, IIDA, LEED AP, design principal, interiors, Jacobs, Cambridge, MA
Timothy Foulkes, FASA, INCE, principal, consultant, Cavanaugh Tocci, Sudbury, MA

 

[T208] CULTURE, NEUROSCIENCE AND DESIGN
Tuesday, June 13 • 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Does culture influence how we process sensory information and the sorts of spaces where we live our best lives? Neuroscience has shown that the answer is yes, and that designers can increase user well-being by applying the current research of culture to inform the selection of specific, culturally appropriate design elements. This session will examine case studies from Europe, Asia and the Americas to illustrate how place form should recognize and respond to users’ national cultures. Attendees will develop an improved understanding of how national cultures differ, and will be able to identify relevant, project-related attributes of national cultures. They will also become aware of the available research in this field, as well as developing insights that can be used to design spaces using this research. [HC][HSW][PD] Dr. Sally Augustin, APA, principal, Design With Science, LaGrange Park, IL

 

[T213] DESIGNING FOR THE 50 PERCENT: HOSPITALITY FOR THE SAVVY TRAVELING WOMAN
Tuesday, June 13 • 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Women are earning more, spending more and influencing all levels of the travel industry. Our panel will focus on hospitality design for the 50 percent of the population that’s in charge of 80 percent of the travel decisions made today. Attendees will encounter examples of successful and creative solutions to items that are often overlooked, while learning how to design universal spaces that speak to this growing trend in the industry. Learn what design trends female travelers are looking for; unique solutions for hospitality design relating to various demographics; universal design considerations; and important technological advances to consider. [INTERMEDIATE][HSW][HOSP] Meg Prendergast, principal, The Gettys Group, Chicago, IL
Cheryl Durst, Hon. FIIDA, LEED AP, executive vice-president and CEO, International Interior Design Association, Chicago, IL
Mari Balestrazzi, vice president of design, Hyatt Hotels Corporation, Chicago, IL

 

[T215] DESIGNING A BRAND THROUGH ART AND ARCHITECTURE: A TALE OF TWO HOSPITALS
Tuesday, June 13 • 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
In today’s healthcare market, designers are expected to enhance brand recognition in addition to designing physical space. We’ll hone in on a recent successful case study: one of the first facilities in the country to use art and architecture to create a complete brand identity that carries through in all three locations, while maintaining a unique identity for each. This session will discuss the challenges and outcomes of brand creation for the project, both architecturally and artistically. You will see the ability of art and architecture to convey a client’s brand, organizational mission and values; discover the challenges of incorporating a brand into architectural design, especially within the highly-regulated healthcare industry; identify how recent trends in healthcare design can impact an organization’s brand promise; and understand the concrete steps in the process of building a brand by utilizing architectural and artistic language. [INTERMEDIATE][FC/R][HC] Julie Robertson, IIDA, senior interior designer, HDR, Minneapolis, MN
Alena Sakalouski, AIA, healthcare planner, women’s services leader, architect, HDR, Minneapolis, MN

 

[T216] TINY LIVING = BIG REWARDS IN STUDENT HOUSING
Tuesday, June 13 • 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Tiny Living is sweeping the country as part of the drive for more affordable living options. At the same time, many universities are looking for more cost-effective approaches to student housing. The Tiny Living movement brings to light new ways of designing student housing, emphasizing quality over quantity and creating places for activities and social interaction. This session will explore why Tiny Living helps create great student spaces at reduced costs and will share real results from universities that are employing this new model. We will share information about the Tiny Living movement and why it is so appealing; discuss challenges facing student housing today and how Tiny Living presents solutions to many of them; and analyze case studies to discover successes and learning opportunities. [INTERMEDIATE][FM][INST][RES] Tomas Eliaeson, AIA, LEED AP, director of design, Little, Charlotte, NC
Thomas Carlson-Reddig, AIA, LEED AP, global practice leader, Little, Charlotte, NC

 

[T222] RECIPE FOR SUCCESS: HOW TO BLEND GREEN VS. CLEAN IN HEALTHCARE
Tuesday, June 13 • 2:30 PM – 3:30 PM
100,000 lives are lost to hospital-acquired infections each year in the U.S. At the same time, there are major concerns about energy usage, indoor air quality and chemical exposure in the health care industry. How can we balance these two critical issues? This session will demonstrate, through one representative case study, that it’s possible to address both. Attendees will learn about hospital-acquired infections and the risks they pose to patients, visitors and staff; chemicals of concern, indoor air quality and how environmental design impacts patient health and safety; and how we, as designers of the built environment, can promote good infection prevention in an environmentally friendly way. [INTERMEDIATE][GR][HC][HSW] Janet Kobylka, RID, CHID, EDAC, LEED AP, lead interior designer and transition planner, Workplace Solutions, Dallas, TX
Ardis Hutchins, AIA, IIDA, AAHID, EDAC, interior architect, UW Health, Madison, WI

Wednesday

 

[W300] 1871 – LESSONS LEARNED BUILDING THE LARGEST ENTREPRENUERIAL ECOSYSTEM IN THE US
Wednesday, June 14 • 9:30 AM – 10:30 AM
This unique program offers attendees an up-close and personal presentation from a renowned expert in the arena of high tech start-ups. Howard Tullman, CEO of 1871, along with Barbara Pollack of Barbara S. Pollack & Associates, will discuss the lessons learned from designing and building the expansion phases of 1871, which has made it the largest startup incubator in the United States. With an initial open office concept, now expanded to more than 150,000 square feet, and with over 2,000 entrepreneurs visiting the space daily, learn how they navigated the design challenges of an entrepreneurial ecosystem. Tullman is the founder of more than a dozen high-tech companies and advisor to Chicago’s Mayor Emanuel, as well as dozens of innovative startup organizations and government entities. [BASIC][FM][FT][OF] Howard Tullman, CEO, 1871, Chicago, IL
Barbara Pollack, owner, Barbara S. Pollack & Associates, Chicago, IL

 

[W305] DESIGNING A WORKPLACE FOR NON-PROFITS
Wednesday, June 14 • 9:30 AM – 10:30 AM
The abiding challenge of designing the non-profit workplace is to keep overhead low while retaining a high return on investment. In fact, every dollar spent represents the non-profit’s investment in growing its organization and broadening its reach to the community it serves. When you join this seminar, you’ll learn to translate this challenge into specific fiscal responsibilities. Besides, you’ll discover how to seek out organizations that help provide non-profits with the right materials and furniture. To cap off this seminar, we’ll address how to link the non-profit’s workplace to its brand and mission. [INTERMEDIATE][FM][HSW][OF] Jim Kales, CEO, Aspire, Hillside, IL
Marc Adelman, AIA, CFM, CCS, principal, tvsdesign, Chicago, IL
Jennifer Sobecki, CEO, Designs for Dignity, Chicago, IL

 

[W309] USE EVERY INCH IN EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENTS!
Wednesday, June 14 • 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
By definition and nature, educational environments tend to be large. But if we only allow such large, known spaces into our thinking, we’ll overlook a design opportunity. What about spaces beyond the classroom, and what about un-utilized and neglected spaces? Wouldn’t these spaces allow for more student learning and creativity? Attendees will learn to identify underutilized spaces and to maximize the use of both existing and new environments. We’ll also investigate campus trends in classroom and beyond-classroom uses. In doing so, we’ll look into how to select furnishings appropriate for varying spaces. [PS][HSW][INST] Daniela Voith, FAIA, LEED AP BD+C, principal, Voith & Mactavish Architects, Philadelphia, PA

 

[W311] PERCEPTIONS OF LED LIGHT AND COLOR: DESIGNING LIGHTING STRATEGIES FOR MILLENIALS AND BABY BOOMERS
Wednesday, June 14 • 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Understanding how to best employ the effects of LED lighting is crucial, now more than ever. Indeed, recent research, targeting both millennials and baby boomers, focuses on the importance of LED light on interiors and people. Attendees will learn about these findings, which are concerned with public environments and lighting strategies. We’ll challenge ourselves as designers to consider perceptions of color temperature and their effects of material appearance, as an avenue for surpassing conventional metrics. In doing so, we’ll also appreciate the significance of user perceptions during design. How generational differences play out in lighting preferences and how to best use this information will also be discussed. [INTERMEDIATE][PS][INST][LT] Rebekah Matheny, IIDA, assistant professor, interior design, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
Emily Bell, IIDA, assistant, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

 

[315] EVIDENCE-BASED DESIGN: NOT JUST FOR HEALTHCARE ANYMORE
Wednesday, June 14 • 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Evidence-based design (EBD) research has led the way in transforming and humanizing the healthcare environment. However, EBD principles are applicable to other built environments as well, such as education, retail, hospitality and the office. This presentation will explore how EBD guidelines have been implemented in healthcare applications and how these principles can be beneficially applied in non-healthcare projects to create more socially supportive, people-friendly spaces. Through examination of case studies, we will: clarify the principles of evidence-based design; demonstrate how these principles have been applied in healthcare design; show how EBD can be applied in other settings; and explore the future of EBD. [INTERMEDIATE][HC][HSW][HOSP][INST] Janet Kobylka, RID, CHID, EDAC, LEED AP, lead interior designer and transition planner, Workplace Solution, Dallas, TX
Deborah Fuller, RID, IIDA, LEED AP BD+C, ID+C, project manager, interior designer, ENTOS DESIGN, Dallas, TX

 

[W319] THE FIVE RULES FOR DESIGNING TRANSFORMATIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS
Wednesday, June 14 • 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Constant changes in demographics, economy, technology and pedagogy require responsive, adaptable, fast-evolving learning environments. New spaces for education should function as a live organism, capable of adapting and evolving organically, seeking higher human function and educational experience by eliminating current constraints of space, furniture and technology. Explore the five rules that cross the boundaries of architecture, interiors and manufacturing, enabling designers to conceptualize new learning environments that create movement, fluidity and rapid transformation. [INTERMEDIATE][FC/R][FT][HSW][INST] Vuk Vujovic, Associate AIA, LEED AP BD+C, vice presidenet, director of sustainability and energy, Legat Architects, Chicago, IL
Sylvia Kowalk, LEED ID+C, director of interior design, Legat Architects, Chicago, IL