973.509.7277
  • Corporate

    The Golf Channel hit a hole in one with the revitalization of part of its Orlando campus. The channel turned to Walker Design LLC to create a high-functioning, multi-use space within a 1,200-square-foot area. The space holds conference and training areas plus a genius bar. It has fully integrated audio/visual technology, integrated writable surfaces for informal gatherings and multiple movable seating options that can house 150 occupants. The floor and ceiling patterns reflect lively, pixelated textures to contrast with and balance the static walls. Photography by Chad Baumer Photography.

    Related ArticleMore
  • Healthcare

    UCHealth Longs Peak Hospital in Longmont, Colo., was designed by EYP Health to be an expandable, site-adaptable inpatient chassis that UCHealth could use at other locations. The new 210,000-square-foot hospital provides more than 50 inpatient beds and room to expand to more than 100. The hospital features an intensive care unit, operating rooms, a Level III trauma center and emergency department, advanced cardiac services, a birth center with a Level II special care nursery, a surgery center and 24-hour retail pharmacy, lab and imaging services. Photography by Jim Roof.

    Related ArticleMore
  • Education

    Do football facilities engender championships? Clemson University believes so. The 2016 National Champs invested $55 million in a new 142,500-square-foot facility designed by HOK. The Allen N. Reeves Football Complex further elevates Clemson’s program and promotes the recruitment, training and development of student-athletes. The facility is adjacent to Clemson’s Indoor Football Practice Facility and the existing outdoor practice fields, bringing all football activity into close proximity allowing for more efficient daily operations. Photos courtesy of HOK.

    Related ArticleMore

Corporate

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Healthcare

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Government

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Sustainable

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

ProHealth Care cancer facility is embraced by its community

by Roger Briggs

ProHealth_2015-8_012

Research has found that the design of a healthcare space can speed the recovery of patients. Roger Ulrich, a visiting professor of architecture at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden, was one of the first to study how the design of a hospital impacts patients. In a paper published in 1984, “View through a window may influence recovery from surgery,” Ulrich showed that patients who were placed in a room with a view of trees got better quicker and had shorter stays and fewer complications than patients in a room with a view of a wall. Since then, additional studies have shown similar results, prompting organizations to incorporate the findings when developing healthcare spaces.

ProHealth Care, a community healthcare system based in Waukesha County, Wisconsin, took this research to heart in its recent interior design plans aimed at improving the health of its community. ProHealth collaborated with Staples Advantage, the business to business division of Staples that provides a variety of services to hospitals, integrated delivery networks (IDNs), and group purchasing organization (GPOs), including product specification and design. Staples advised ProHealth on the design of its latest facility, the UW Cancer Center, which opened in August 2015. Cannon Design is the facility architect and interior design firm for three-story, the 160,000-sq.-ft. facility. ProHealth_2015-10_001

Staples Advantage and ProHealth have worked together since 2009 to create design and product standards. As a design and furniture partner, Staples Advantage provides ProHealth Care with furniture that meets its standards, budget and design requirements for the facility that offers 28 treatment chairs and anticipates 35,000 patient visits per year. Additionally, Staples Advantage helps identify the best choices for furnishings to improve the experience of patients and their families and to maintain a healthy work environment.

“Our mission at ProHealth – why we exist – is to continuously improve the health of our community,” said Pam Kleba, construction project manager at ProHealth Care, who was a key figure in coordinating the cancer center building. “That can go well beyond the clinical care health of the community. The furniture, the building, the artwork—all of that supports the health and wellness of our community, and that includes patients, and staff and providers.”
Staples Advantage also connected ProHealth Care with a healthcare ergonomist to assess the staff’s needs. The ergonomist, an expert in the occupational movements of health care professionals, met with staff to review the environment and discuss the specific needs of the space for patient care, from comfort to ease-of-use and the materials used in furniture. The team also met with environmental services and facility managers to understand the type of cleaning products required for the new space and furniture.

ProHealth reception“Cancer patients are immuno-compromised patients, so the cleaning that needs to be done to these spaces, as well as the furniture, is heavy duty,” says Kleba. “We have to make sure that the furniture, and the fabric can withstand that type of cleaning. And that goes for an exam table, too. We have to be sure that that piece of equipment works in function, but can be cleaned well.”

Staples Advantage also incorporates the interests of patients and their families by including them in design discussions through a patient advisory council for the cancer care center.

The Staples Advantage team lead is given a seat at the table with planners, designers, and construction teams, as well as staff, providers, and patients. Staples Advantage helps connect the different groups of people and see potential furniture and fabric solutions that can benefit everyone. This benefits ProHealth by breaking down silos. Additionally, Staples Advantage helps ProHealth stay on top of the latest trends in the furniture industry. It’s critical to understand how to make a space both functional and affordable as well as in line with industry standards.

ProHealth held an open house at the cancer center in July 2015, anticipating 2,500 people. Instead, there were 5,000. “It was an absolutely stellar day,” said Kleba. “It made all of us in ProHealth Care realize what a great opportunity we have to serve the community and what this building is able to do to support that.”

 

Roger Briggs is the Business Development Director, Healthcare Furniture, Staples Advantage.