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  • Corporate

    The Golf Channel hit a hole in one with the revitalization of part of its Orlando campus. The channel turned to Walker Design LLC to create a high-functioning, multi-use space within a 1,200-square-foot area. The space holds conference and training areas plus a genius bar. It has fully integrated audio/visual technology, integrated writable surfaces for informal gatherings and multiple movable seating options that can house 150 occupants. The floor and ceiling patterns reflect lively, pixelated textures to contrast with and balance the static walls. Photography by Chad Baumer Photography.

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  • Healthcare

    UCHealth Longs Peak Hospital in Longmont, Colo., was designed by EYP Health to be an expandable, site-adaptable inpatient chassis that UCHealth could use at other locations. The new 210,000-square-foot hospital provides more than 50 inpatient beds and room to expand to more than 100. The hospital features an intensive care unit, operating rooms, a Level III trauma center and emergency department, advanced cardiac services, a birth center with a Level II special care nursery, a surgery center and 24-hour retail pharmacy, lab and imaging services. Photography by Jim Roof.

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  • Education

    Do football facilities engender championships? Clemson University believes so. The 2016 National Champs invested $55 million in a new 142,500-square-foot facility designed by HOK. The Allen N. Reeves Football Complex further elevates Clemson’s program and promotes the recruitment, training and development of student-athletes. The facility is adjacent to Clemson’s Indoor Football Practice Facility and the existing outdoor practice fields, bringing all football activity into close proximity allowing for more efficient daily operations. Photos courtesy of HOK.

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Corporate

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Healthcare

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Government

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Sustainable

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

RICS: U.S. needs infrastructure management strategy

Rics.As President Donald Trump plans to unveil his infrastructure proposal, a RICS research report sets out how policymakers and the private sector can work in tandem to address the long term infrastructure demands that ensure public works investments realize financial and social benefits.

The report called ‘Infrastructure Management: Current Practices and Future Trends’, makes the case for how public-private sector partnerships (P3) can inform a comprehensive strategy to manage the massive demands for new public assets and to manage already built public assets.

The report is based on conversations and roundtable discussions with industry leaders and professionals who work across the infrastructure sector. By providing a framework of current practices and challenges, it sets out a range of recommendations for policymakers.

This report is timely as the Trump administration looks to raise an estimated $1 trillion in proposed funding for significant public infrastructure investment over the next 10 years.

Top five insights from Infrastructure Management: Current Practices and Future Trends

  1. Politicians and policymakers are encouraged to look beyond election cycles and what the report calls “the ribbon cutting syndrome.” Massive infrastructure projects require strategies that make them more efficient and reduce lifecycle costs in the long term. They should not be informed by the lowest costs that appeals in the short term.
  2. During roundtable discussions in New York, Washington DC and Toronto, experts in infrastructure investment, construction and operations agreed that infrastructure projects are overly complicated and require extensive upfront planning to estimate pricing risks and payback models. As one leader commented: “Conducting infrastructure projects across the United States is like trying to do business across 50 different countries.”
  3. The report points to a few successful infrastructure funding models through public-private partnerships (P3). Most US projects are funded through debt finance whereas Canada, for example, has successfully partnered with the private sector to reach long-term public infrastructure needs.
  4. Infrastructure impacts on people’s lives! While debates can often be overshadowed by political processes and the cost of a project, recent bridge collapses and the Flint water crisis, for example, grab national attention. This reminds the public of how infrastructure, and the decline thereof, has an impact on their lives.
  5. Considering that the combined average age of infrastructure in the U.S. is at the end of the 20–30 year lifecycle, this report makes the case for a better strategy to reduce the lifecycle measure to a more sustainable average age of 15 years.

RICS is a global professional body working across land, real estate, construction and infrastructure. We have a public interest mandate to engage government and industry leaders on this report. Working in more than 140 markets across the world, RICS aims to instill market confidence and build trust across the built environment.