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  • Corporate

    The Golf Channel hit a hole in one with the revitalization of part of its Orlando campus. The channel turned to Walker Design LLC to create a high-functioning, multi-use space within a 1,200-square-foot area. The space holds conference and training areas plus a genius bar. It has fully integrated audio/visual technology, integrated writable surfaces for informal gatherings and multiple movable seating options that can house 150 occupants. The floor and ceiling patterns reflect lively, pixelated textures to contrast with and balance the static walls. Photography by Chad Baumer Photography.

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  • Healthcare

    UCHealth Longs Peak Hospital in Longmont, Colo., was designed by EYP Health to be an expandable, site-adaptable inpatient chassis that UCHealth could use at other locations. The new 210,000-square-foot hospital provides more than 50 inpatient beds and room to expand to more than 100. The hospital features an intensive care unit, operating rooms, a Level III trauma center and emergency department, advanced cardiac services, a birth center with a Level II special care nursery, a surgery center and 24-hour retail pharmacy, lab and imaging services. Photography by Jim Roof.

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    Do football facilities engender championships? Clemson University believes so. The 2016 National Champs invested $55 million in a new 142,500-square-foot facility designed by HOK. The Allen N. Reeves Football Complex further elevates Clemson’s program and promotes the recruitment, training and development of student-athletes. The facility is adjacent to Clemson’s Indoor Football Practice Facility and the existing outdoor practice fields, bringing all football activity into close proximity allowing for more efficient daily operations. Photos courtesy of HOK.

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Corporate

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Healthcare

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Government

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Sustainable

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Sara Marberry: Four patient safety issues impacted by environment

Sponsored by:

Sara Marberry

Sara Marberry

Intergra Logo

What are the top patient safety issues for 2018? And which of them are impacted by the hospital environment?

Recently Becker’s Clinical Leadership & Infection Control editorial team picked its top 10 patient safety issues. These were based on news, study findings, and trends reported in the past year.

Of the 10, four can be directly impacted by the hospital’s physical environment. Here they are, in no particular order:

1. Lack of Proper Hand Hygiene

While there has been progress in improving hand hygiene, it remains an issue. Giving patients hand-held signs to remind physicians to wash their hands and text-messaging to healthcare workers via smartphones have been shown to significantly increase compliance.

Physical environment contributors: poor room and/or unit layout, with sinks and gel dispensers hidden behind doors.

Design solutions: placement of sinks and gel dispensers, visual cues (lighting, pattern, color), and automatic faucets.

2. Physician Burnout

A decrease in the amount of time spent with patients and increase in time spent doing data entry and clerical work is contributing to the number of physicians who experience frequent or constant feelings of burnout.

Physical environment contributors: poor workplace environments that are crowded, messy and noisy; have bad lighting and no access to nature or natural light; and offer no place for respite.

Design solutions: pleasant breakrooms that offer positive distractions and views, outdoor spaces, unit configuration that provides views to outdoors and daylight, adequate workspaces with proper lighting and supportive seating, surface materials that minimize noise, storage for equipment and supplies, color-tuning light systems that mimic circadian rhythms.

3. Antibiotic Resistance

At the top of the World Health Organization’s list of most dangerous superbugs are three strains of bacteria resistant to the antibiotic carbapeneum. And while carbapeneum-resistant hospital-acquired infections in the U.S. haven’t necessarily been linked to person-to-person contact, officials are concerned it is being spread by other means.

Physical environment contributors: contaminated surface materials, seating with cracks and crevices that capture dirt, poor air quality and/or circulation.

Design solutions: private patient rooms, bacteria-resistant materials and finishes, easily cleanable materials and finishes, HEPA filters, seating designed to minimize dirt collection, “clean” lights that kill bacteria.

4. Opioid Epidemic

Post-surgical use of opioids is likely to be an important concern for healthcare professionals in the coming year. Expect use of virtual reality and other nonpharmacologic treatments for pain to increase.

Physical environment contributors: noisy, messy, crowded, poorly lit patient rooms.

Design solutions: positive distractions, such as access to nature or art, as well as relaxation programming choices for the TV/patient portal. Surface materials and unit layout that help reduce noise, storage for equipment and supplies, controllable lighting, space for family members.

Want to Know More About Designing for Safety?

Check out The Center for Health Design’s Safety Risk Assessment Tool.

What other design solutions have you used to promote safety?

This column, sponsored by Integra, manufacturer of beautiful seating solutions for lounge and reception areas since 1982, originally appeared on Sara Marberry’s blog on Feb. 2, 2018. Marberry is a healthcare design expert who has written/edited five books and is a regular contributor to Healthcare Design magazine. Marberry also is a former Executive Vice President of the nonprofit Center for Health Design.