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  • Corporate

    The Golf Channel hit a hole in one with the revitalization of part of its Orlando campus. The channel turned to Walker Design LLC to create a high-functioning, multi-use space within a 1,200-square-foot area. The space holds conference and training areas plus a genius bar. It has fully integrated audio/visual technology, integrated writable surfaces for informal gatherings and multiple movable seating options that can house 150 occupants. The floor and ceiling patterns reflect lively, pixelated textures to contrast with and balance the static walls. Photography by Chad Baumer Photography.

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  • Healthcare

    Designed by HOK, the new Prebys Cardiovascular Institute in La Jolla, Calif., is conceived to be the region’s largest and most advanced center dedicated to cardiovascular care. Interior spaces support advanced medical treatment, patient care, research, clinical trials and graduate medical education. The seven-story, 167-bed hospital includes 59 intensive care beds, four operating rooms, two hybrid operating rooms, three cardiac catheterization labs and an electrophysiology lab connected to centralized research labs, and a center for graduate education. Stephen Whalen Photography

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  • Government

    The Wayne N. Aspinall Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Grand Junction, Colorado, received partial modernization and a high-performing green building renovation by the U. S. General Services Administration, Rocky Mountain Region. The Design-Build Partners were The Beck Group, as Design-Build Contractor and Architect-of-Record; and Westlake Reed Leskosky, was the Lead Design Architect, Integrated Engineer, Sustainable Design and Historic Preservation Consultant. Photography by Kevin G. Reeves.

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Corporate

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Healthcare

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Government

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Sustainable

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Sara Marberry: No more boring healthcare facilities

Sponsored by:

Sara Marberry

Sara Marberry

Intergra LogoCan buildings cause us to behave in certain ways?

Think about how you feel/act when you enter a majestic cathedral — Notre Dame, in Paris, for example.  The soaring ceilings, stone walls, beautiful stained glass, muted light are peaceful and inspiring.

No one yells or gets upset in these types of environments.

And what about the exterior? A study by Colin Ellard, a neuroscientist at the University of Waterloo, found that people’s stress levels increased when they were walking past a boring building facade versus one that had more going on.

He further concluded that boredom can also generate stress, making the point of what that would do to people who work in “oppressively dull” environments every day.

Details Matter Most

According to architecture critic/instructor/author Sarah Williams Goldhagen, what matters to people most is not the exterior building form, but rather the interior details.  In her new book, “Welcome to Your World:  How the Built Environment Shapes Our Lives,”Goldhagen explores the reasons why some places make us feel happy and others don’t.

It’s the notion of embodied cognition, or very simply, the scientific notion that the mind influences the body and the body influences the mind.

I haven’t read Goldhagen’s book yet but did read a fascinating interview with her that was recently published by CityLab. One of the things she said that struck me was this:

“Architects tend, particularly with parametric design, to emphasize overall aggregate form, and all the other stuff gets filled in later. And then, very often, it’s value-engineered out. That’s what’s creating a lot of the impoverishment in the environment.”

What Does This Mean for Healthcare Facility Design?

While the design of healthcare facilities has significantly improved in the past 25 years, there are still plenty of boring hospitals and clinics out there.

This means that a hospital with a plain facade may stress patients even before they enter. And staff members who work long shifts in environments that lack variety may also feel anxious or depressed.

This is all common sense, right?

Well, yes, but those making decisions about healthcare facility design always seem to need proof so they don’t value-engineer out all the good stuff.  The research about embodied cognition can and should inform the evidence-based design process.

Just remember, as Winston Churchill said, “We shape our buildings, and afterwards our buildings shape us.” Truer words were never spoken for healthcare facility design.

This column, sponsored by Integra, manufacturer of beautiful seating solutions for lounge and reception areas since 1982, originally appeared on Sara Marberry’s blog on Aug. 4, 2017. Marberry is a healthcare design expert who has written/edited five books and is regular contributor to Healthcare Design magazine. Marberry also is a former Executive Vice President of the nonprofit Center for Health Design.