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    The Golf Channel hit a hole in one with the revitalization of part of its Orlando campus. The channel turned to Walker Design LLC to create a high-functioning, multi-use space within a 1,200-square-foot area. The space holds conference and training areas plus a genius bar. It has fully integrated audio/visual technology, integrated writable surfaces for informal gatherings and multiple movable seating options that can house 150 occupants. The floor and ceiling patterns reflect lively, pixelated textures to contrast with and balance the static walls. Photography by Chad Baumer Photography.

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    UCHealth Longs Peak Hospital in Longmont, Colo., was designed by EYP Health to be an expandable, site-adaptable inpatient chassis that UCHealth could use at other locations. The new 210,000-square-foot hospital provides more than 50 inpatient beds and room to expand to more than 100. The hospital features an intensive care unit, operating rooms, a Level III trauma center and emergency department, advanced cardiac services, a birth center with a Level II special care nursery, a surgery center and 24-hour retail pharmacy, lab and imaging services. Photography by Jim Roof.

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    Do football facilities engender championships? Clemson University believes so. The 2016 National Champs invested $55 million in a new 142,500-square-foot facility designed by HOK. The Allen N. Reeves Football Complex further elevates Clemson’s program and promotes the recruitment, training and development of student-athletes. The facility is adjacent to Clemson’s Indoor Football Practice Facility and the existing outdoor practice fields, bringing all football activity into close proximity allowing for more efficient daily operations. Photos courtesy of HOK.

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Corporate

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Healthcare

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Government

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Sustainable

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

BBG report: Tech boom expanding to smaller U.S. Cities

Tech firms are being drawn to smaller cities like Nashville.

Tech firms are being drawn to smaller cities like Nashville, New Orleans and Raleigh-Durham. 

Technology hubs are no longer found only in large urban areas like San Franciscoand New York City, as more tech companies are opting to locate their operations in smaller U.S. cities in the Midwest and the South, according to BBG, a leading independent national commercial real-estate valuation, advisory and assessment firm.

Tech firms are increasingly bypassing celebrated tech centers like Northern California’s Silicon Valley and New York City’s Silicon Alley in favor of cities which are not typically associated with the technology sector, such as Cleveland, New Orleans, Austin, Nashville, and Raleigh-Durham, N.C.

For example, Nashville has been the recipient of 30 percent growth in tech companies between 2010 and 2015, making the city the country’s fourth-largest tech hub. In Charlotte, N.C., technology companies grew jobs by more than 60 percent between 2006 and 2016, and posted 18 percent growth between 2014 and 2016, the fastest rate in the country.

Tech firms are flocking to mid-sized and small cities because of the availability of a large pool of skilled workers, good quality of life, lower prices for office space and housing, and easy access to major highways and airports.

The tech exodus to smaller regions across the country is expected to play a significant role in stoking the economic engines in these areas. According to a TechNet and Progressive Policy Institute study released earlier this year, an estimated one million tech jobs will be added in 25 U.S. cities within five years.

A recent government report supported the trend of smaller U.S. cities benefiting from the tech boom. The report said the regions outside the top 35 metropolitan areas represented almost half of net new establishments. In the prior seven years, the part of the country outside the larger areas accounted for less than one-fifth of net new establishments.

The country’s expanding tech sector also has been a key driver for office space. Technology companies were responsible for nearly 25 percent in total office leasing activity, according to an industry report.

BBG CEO Chris Roach commented on the country’s tech spread: “America’s tech eco-system is rapidly expanding beyond large urban areas as a result of companies easily acquiring the resources they need in smaller metropolitan areas, enabling  them to remain innovative in a competitive landscape. While the country’s large, established tech hubs will stay active, the small and mid-sized cities will be well-positioned to attract more tech business in the years ahead, resulting in strong economic activity overall in those areas.”