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    The Golf Channel hit a hole in one with the revitalization of part of its Orlando campus. The channel turned to Walker Design LLC to create a high-functioning, multi-use space within a 1,200-square-foot area. The space holds conference and training areas plus a genius bar. It has fully integrated audio/visual technology, integrated writable surfaces for informal gatherings and multiple movable seating options that can house 150 occupants. The floor and ceiling patterns reflect lively, pixelated textures to contrast with and balance the static walls. Photography by Chad Baumer Photography.

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    UCHealth Longs Peak Hospital in Longmont, Colo., was designed by EYP Health to be an expandable, site-adaptable inpatient chassis that UCHealth could use at other locations. The new 210,000-square-foot hospital provides more than 50 inpatient beds and room to expand to more than 100. The hospital features an intensive care unit, operating rooms, a Level III trauma center and emergency department, advanced cardiac services, a birth center with a Level II special care nursery, a surgery center and 24-hour retail pharmacy, lab and imaging services. Photography by Jim Roof.

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    Do football facilities engender championships? Clemson University believes so. The 2016 National Champs invested $55 million in a new 142,500-square-foot facility designed by HOK. The Allen N. Reeves Football Complex further elevates Clemson’s program and promotes the recruitment, training and development of student-athletes. The facility is adjacent to Clemson’s Indoor Football Practice Facility and the existing outdoor practice fields, bringing all football activity into close proximity allowing for more efficient daily operations. Photos courtesy of HOK.

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Corporate

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Healthcare

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Government

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Sustainable

The McMorrow Corporate Facilities Management Report presents news, information, feature articles, conferences, and products and services for commercial/corporate facility executives and administrators, property managers, and specifiers including architects, designers, and engineers charged with maintaining the workplace for optimal productivity, functionality, and retention of the workplace professional.

Two tips to extend the life of utility and transport vehicles

To extend the life of utility vehicles, FMs should look for rustproof, corrosion-resistant, aircraft-grade aluminum frames like this one.

To extend the life of utility vehicles, FMs should look for rustproof, corrosion-resistant, aircraft-grade aluminum frames like this one.

Buying a fleet of utility and transport vehicles is a major investment. So you’ll want durable vehicles that provide years of service. Unfortunately, many utility vehicles experience early damage due to water, chemicals, fertilizers and other environmental factors. Further, many of them are actually recreational vehicles sold into commercial markets.

Bill Dakuras, global director of sales and business development at Club Car, shares his two top tips for extending the life of your utility and transport vehicles.

1. Look for utility vehicles engineered on aluminum frames.

Most utility vehicles are built on heavy steel frames. Their manufacturers often position that as a strength. In truth, steel frames are subject to rust in wet, corrosive environments.

This is true even of steel frames that have been powder coated to “prevent rust” because the powder coating is easily scratched. What’s more, the coating is generally not applied to the inside of the frame. That means rust may get a foothold inside the frame, spread and devalue your investment.

Look for utility vehicles, people movers and street-legal low speed vehicles (LSVs)  built on rustproof, corrosion-resistant aluminum frames. They withstand water, salt and lawn chemicals. And, when designed with an I-beam construction, they resist impact better than steel frames, even those rented by contractor and used in grueling construction applications.

“Our Carryall® utility vehicles with rustproof aluminum frames are holding up much better than the other vehicles we have tried in the past. We keep them rented all the time, and have very few problems,” says Joe Alonzo, Co-owner of RG Rents, an independent rental company in St. Louis, Mo., that services commercial contractors.

2. Don’t play around. Look for utility vehicles engineered for work.

Many utility vehicles sold into commercial or government markets are actually built for recreational use, with speeds of up to 50 miles per hour. That’s just asking for trouble on work sites. Further, their suspension systems are designed for speed, not load carrying. These vehicles can’t hack tough commercial applications.

Others are purpose-built for work from the ground up. Their suspension systems are designed specifically for load carrying. They generally have much higher bed and towing capacities than vehicles built for recreational use.

“The Club Car vehicles we use are built like tanks. We have a lot fewer breakdowns than we did with the vehicles we were using before,” says Charles Gettis, equipment and PTV mechanic at Georgia College and State University in Milledgeville, Ga.